Agenda and draft minutes

Council
Tuesday, 14 January 2020 6.30 pm

Venue: Council Chamber

Contact: Rebecca Owen, Democratic Services Manager on 01455255879 or email  rebecca.owen@hinckley-bosworth.gov.uk 

Items
No. Item

251.

Apologies

Minutes:

Apologies for absence were submitted on behalf of Councillors Bray, Furlong, Smith and H Williams.

252.

Minutes of the previous meeting pdf icon PDF 77 KB

To confirm the minutes of the meeting held on 5 November.

Minutes:

It was moved by Councillor Bill, seconded by Councillor Lynch and

 

RESOLVED – the minutes of the meeting held on 5 November 2019 be approved and signed by the Mayor.

253.

Declarations of interest

To receive verbally from Members any disclosures which they are required to make in accordance with the Council's code of conduct or in pursuance of Section 106 of the Local Government Finance Act 1992. This is in addition to the need for such disclosure to be also given when the relevant matter is reached on the Agenda.

Minutes:

No interests were declared at this stage.

254.

Mayor's Communications

To receive such communications as the Mayor may decide to lay before the Council.

Minutes:

During her communications, the Mayor referred to the recent passing of former Mayor Geoff Payne, recent events that she had attended and her forthcoming charity event in March.

 

Councillors Bill, Lay and Lynch responded with fond memories of former Councillor Payne.

255.

Petitions

Petition from Cllr Lay on behalf of residents of Stanton Under Bardon submitted in accordance with Council Procedure Rule 15:

 

“Protect Stanton Under Bardon. STOP THE BARDON 2 EXPANSION

 

In May 2019, Luxembourg based Mountpark Logistics EU Sarl requested a Screening and Scoping Opinion from Hinckley & Bosworth Borough Council. Mountpark are considering a large extension to the existing Bardon Distribution Park along Stanton Lane to within barely a mile of our village. If successful, the proposal will result in the extensive loss of agricultural land and wildlife habitat as well as noise and traffic disruption for the local community.

 

We the undersigned call upon Hinckley & Bosworth Borough Council to refuse planning permission for any application to extend the existing Bardon Distribution Park to the west of the A585 onto greenfield land located within The National Forest and the parish of Stanton Under Bardon.”

Minutes:

Councillor Lay presented the following petition in accordance with Council Procedure Rule 15:

 

“Protect Stanton Under Bardon. STOP THE BARDON 2 EXPANSION

 

In May 2019, Luxembourg based Mountpark Logistics EU Sarl requested a Screening and Scoping Opinion from Hinckley & Bosworth Borough Council. Mountpark are considering a large extension to the existing Bardon Distribution Park along Stanton Lane to within barely a mile of our village. If successful, the proposal will result in the extensive loss of agricultural land and wildlife habitat as well as noise and traffic disruption for the local community.

 

We the undersigned call upon Hinckley & Bosworth Borough Council to refuse planning permission for any application to extend the existing Bardon Distribution Park to the west of the A585 onto greenfield land located within The National Forest and the parish of Stanton Under Bardon.”

 

The petition would be passed to the relevant officer for consideration.

256.

Leader of the Council's Position Statement pdf icon PDF 70 KB

To receive the Leader of the Council's Position Statement.

Minutes:

In the absence of the Leader due to illness, Councillor Bill presented the Leader’s position statement. He referred to the successful Christmas events hosted by the borough council and Hinckley BID, Feast Hinckley having received a “highly commended” award at the recent Leicestershire Tourism Awards, the production of an updated visitor guide, the crime & disorder survey, increased footfall at Hinckley Leisure Centre, Barwell SUE, the PCC Safer Communities Awards in which HBBC had been shortlisted, the current consultation on free car parking after 3pm in a number of Hinckley town centre car parks, the opening of Dorothy Goodman Secondary School and the council’s financial position.

257.

Minutes of the Scrutiny Commission pdf icon PDF 73 KB

To receive for information only the minutes of the Scrutiny Commission meeting held on 19 December 2019.

Minutes:

The minutes of the Scrutiny Commission held on 19 December were received for information.

258.

Public space protection order pdf icon PDF 198 KB

To seek endorsement of a new Public Space Protection Order.

 

The Scrutiny Commission gave consideration to this at its meeting on 19 December. An extract from the minutes of that meeting is attached.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Consideration was given to a report which sought endorsement for the new Public Space Protection Order (PSPO) for the borough of Hinckley & Bosworth. The difficulty with some parish councils having the financial or staff resources to enforce the Order was discussed and it was explained that parishes could opt into those they wished to sign up to.

 

Concern was expressed by a member that his parish council was not part of the Order. Officers agreed to look into whether they could be added at this late stage but explained that the tight timescales and requirement to consult would make it difficult.

 

It was moved by Councillor Crooks, seconded by Councillor Cartwright and

 

RESOLVED –

 

(i)            the Public Space Protection Order be approved and the three parts be noted:

 

a.    Ban the use across the whole borough of consuming intoxicating substances or new psychoactive substances (legal highs) on public land. A person will commit an offence if they fail to surrender any alcohol when ordered to do so by an authorised officer on public land;

 

b.    Dog control issues on public land including a requirement to remove and correctly dispose of dog faeces, failing to put a dog on a lead when instructed to do so by an authorised officer, and the banning of dogs / requirement to have dogs on leads in specific locations detailed in the report;

 

c.    Green space issues relating to specific sites including the banning of fires and barbecues, restricting the use of remote controlled vehicles, aircraft and motorcycling, and failing to leave a park at closing time when requested to do so, as detailed in the report.

 

(ii)          Authority be delegated to the Head of Street Scene Services to implement the Order.

259.

Motions received in accordance with Council Procedure Rule 17

259a

Motion from Cllr Cartwright, seconded by Cllr Mullaney pdf icon PDF 143 KB

We all know how it is practically impossible these days to do anything without being subjected to health & safety risk assessment.

 

Yet despite this it is still legal to sell explosives, purchase explosives (so long as you are over 18 years of age), ignite explosives just so long as they are called fireworks.

 

Fireworks are used by people throughout the year to mark different events. While they can bring much enjoyment to some people, they can cause significant problems and fear for other people and animals.

 

They can be a source of fear and distress for many animals (including our pet animals, farm livestock and wildlife). Animals affected, not only suffer psychological distress but can also cause themselves injuries – sometimes very serious ones – as they attempt to run away or hide from the noise created which has a far larger impact on their hearing than our own.

 

The unpredictable, loud and high intensity noises that many fireworks make can cause fear.

 

For example, studies have found fireworks to be the most common cause for fear responses in dogs, and it is estimated that 45 percent of dogs show signs of fear when they hear fireworks.

 

Many cats are also terrified of the sudden noise caused by fireworks.

 

With Diwali, bonfire night, October and November is a nightmare for animals and their owners, as you never know exactly when a firework is going to be set off. New Years Eve and endless reasons for parties using fireworks over the winter months. Limiting the number of events to which fireworks can be set off, will much improve the situation, as you can try to be prepared.

 

Debris produced by fireworks, if found on the ground, can also pose a hazard to animals, such as horses and farm livestock.

 

Although there is limited direct evidence, it is also likely that fireworks and their debris will cause disturbance to wildlife, and are likely to cause suffering or distress, depending on the distance from the explosive and the noise level.

 

The short-lived nature of firework noise can make it difficult for the police or local authority’s officers to pinpoint locations and take action.

 

The RSPCA believes that a licensing system would help with better enforcement of the law by allowing enforcement bodies to know where licensed events are being held.

 

Fireworks cause harm to people.

 

Just one accident to any child or adult by a firework could be prevented without the use of fireworks.

 

Professional organised displays significantly reduce the risk of harm to humans.

 

Carbon impact – climate change

 

My other concern is the carbon that is released by fireworks and bonfires over this period and also the use of fireworks to celebrate other occasions such as New Years, concerts etc.

 

The world has a carbon budget. Can we really justify spending part of that budget on entertainment, which already causes a great deal of distress and have such a far ranging impact on the carbon impact and overall climate change impact.  ...  view the full agenda text for item 259a

Minutes:

Councillor Cartwright, seconded by Councillor M Mullaney, proposed a motion relating to reducing the harm from fireworks by requiring public firework displays to be advertised in advance, promoting a public awareness campaign about the impact of fireworks on animals and vulnerable people and the impact on the climate emergency, encouraging local suppliers to stock quieter fireworks, lobbying the government to introduce legislation to limit the noise levels and the number of days and events on which fireworks can be set off.

 

Upon being put to the vote, the motion was CARRIED and it was

 

RESOLVED –

 

(i)            All public firework displays within the local authority boundaries be required to be advertised in advance of the event, allowing residents to take precautions for their animals and vulnerable people;

 

(ii)          A public awareness campaign about the impact of fireworks on animal welfare and vulnerable people, including the precautions that can be taken to mitigate risks, be actively promoted;

 

(iii)         A public awareness campaign about the impact of fireworks on the declared climate emergency in Hinckley & Bosworth be actively promoted;

 

(iv)         Local suppliers of fireworks be encouraged to stock ‘quieter’ fireworks for public display

 

(v)          A letter be written to the UK Government urging them to introduce legislation to limit the maximum noise level of fireworks to 90dB for those sold to the public for private displays

 

(vi)         Government be lobbied to limit the number of days and events at which fireworks can be set off.

259b

Motion from Cllr Cartwright, seconded by Cllr Webber-Jones

Council resolves that Hinckley & Bosworth Borough Council

 

(i)            Acknowledges the efforts that this Council has made and continues to make to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and promote renewable energy

 

(ii)           Recognises that councils can play a central role in creating sustainable communities, particularly through the provision of locally generated renewable electricity

 

(iii)          Further recognises

 

·         That very large financial setup and running costs involved in selling locally generated renewable electricity is a barrier to local customers resulting in it being impossible for local renewable electricity generators to do so

·         That making these financial costs proportionate to the scale of a renewable electricity supplier’s operation would create significant opportunities for councils to be the providers of locally generated renewable electricity directly to local people, businesses and organisations and

·         That revenues received by councils that became local renewable energy providers could be used to help fund local greenhouse gas emissions reduction measures and to help improve local services and facilities.

 

(iv)         Accordingly resolves to support the Local Electricity Bill, currently supported by a cross-party group of MPs, and which, if made law, would make the setup and running costs of selling renewable electricity to local customers proportionate by establishing a Right to Local Supply; and

 

(v)          Further resolves to

 

·         Inform the local media of the Borough Councils decision

·         Write to local MPs, asking them to support the Bill, and

·         Write to the organisers of the campaign for the Bill, Power for People, expressing its support.

Minutes:

Councillor Cartwright, seconded by Councillor Webber-Jones, proposed a motion relating to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and promoting renewable energy. Upon being put to the vote, the motion was CARRIED and it was

 

RESOLVED –

 

(i)            The efforts that this council has made and continues to make to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and promote renewable energy be acknowledged;

 

(ii)          The central role that councils can play in creating sustainable communities, particularly through the provision of locally generated renewable electricity, be recognised;

 

(iii)         It be further recognised

 

·         That very large financial setup and running costs involved in selling locally generated renewable electricity is a barrier to local customers resulting in it being impossible for local renewable electricity generators to do so

·         That making these financial costs proportionate to the scale of a renewable electricity supplier’s operation would create significant opportunities for councils to be the providers of locally generated renewable electricity directly to local people, businesses and organisations and

·         That revenues received by councils that became local renewable energy providers could be used to help fund local greenhouse gas emissions reduction measures and to help improve local services and facilities.

 

(iv)         The Local Electricity Bill be supported;

 

(v)          The local media be informed of Council’s decision;

 

(vi)         Local MPs be contacted to seek support for the Bill;

 

(vii)        The organisers of the campaign for the Bill, Power for People, be contacted to express Council’s support.